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Category Archives: Science

Aliens in Mesopotamia!

And now, for a little something completely different (and a bit crazy).

I came across a documentary series called “Ancient Aliens” on Netflix Instant, which consists of two seasons and 16 episodes, total. I’ve only watched two episodes from season one so far, and I’m very intrigued.

Netflix.com

This investigative series, from 2010, asserts that ancient civilizations, including that of Mesopotamia, had help from extraterrestrial beings, who possessed advanced technologies, including flying saucers and space suits. It sounds crazy, but there are some compelling arguments from scholars, and even non-scholars, who bring their knowledge to the table.

Each episode is a little over an hour and a half long, and although Mesopotamian art is depicted from the beginning, Mesopotamia is not mentioned until about 48 minutes into the second episode, The Visitors.

Mesopotamia’s connection with extraterrestrials is deduced from an ancient Babylonian text found in the Library of Ashurbanipal at Nineveh, in 1849, by British Archaeologist, Sir Austen Henry Layard. Enuma Elish, which dates back to the 7th Century BC, is the Babylonian myth of creation, and tells how the first humans were created by an extraterrestrial race, the Anunnaki.

According to one of the featured scholars in the series, Giorgio A. Tsoukalos, publisher of Legendary Times Magazine, as well as consulting producer of the “Ancient Aliens” series, the Anunnaki are described in the text as beings who descended from the sky by way of flying vehicles, and are depicted in Mesopotamian statues and carvings.

An image of an Anunnaki depicted in the second episode of “Ancient Aliens” that accompanied the segment on Mesopotamia’s connection with extraterrestrials. (http://www.freedomtek.org/en/invisibles/fallen_angels.php)

“[The Anunnaki] looked like modern-day space travelers with weird suits. Some of them wore wristwatches, they had boots on, and helmets, and above all, wings…” Tsoukalos said.

I’ve long since wondered whether ancient civilizations were aliens, and I have expressed that in this blog, albeit jokingly, but the arguments presented in this series are, to a certain degree, convincing.

Sure, some aspects of these theories left me rolling my eyes, and some actually made perfect sense, so I plan to watch the whole thing over time.

I think we owe it to those who set us up in this world to hear all the possibilities of how they might have done it, and whether it was alone or with the help of “ancient astronauts,” it was an amazing feat.

Are you intrigued? Are you going to watch? What do you think of these theories? Let us know in the comments!

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Posted by on March 7, 2012 in Mythology, Science, Video

 

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In Chemistry, it started as a woman’s world

Chemistry might be boring when we’re talking about the Periodic Table of Elements and Hydrogen Carbon Dioxide, but the first documentation of a chemist and a chemist’s work was about something a lot more pleasant to the nostrils and imagination than the chemical makeup of Methane.

According to an About.com article, “Who Was the First Chemist?” by Anne Marie Helmenstine, Ph.D., a Chemistry Guide for the site, a Mesopotamian cuneiform tablet dating to the second millenium B.C. tells us that a woman is the world’s first known chemist.

Tapputi was the woman’s name, and she did just what perfumers still do today, with flowers and other aromatic materials and the process of distillation, which was never documented before.

Tapputi made perfume for the palace where she was a perfumer and overseer, which is most likely the only reason why her efforts were recorded. Nonetheless, the tablet brands Tapputi the world’s first known chemist, as well as the first to use the process of distillation.

Source: http://chemistry.about.com/od/historyofchemistry/f/first-chemist.htm

 
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Posted by on October 21, 2011 in Science, Women

 

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